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Tag: Pathway to Biosimilars Act

Biotech Industry Evaluates Anticipated Impact of Health Care Reform

Written by on Monday, March 22nd, 2010

Well, unless you have spent the last few weeks stranded on a desert island, you probably know that yesterday was the big health care vote.  As expected, the Democratic majority in the House passed the health care reform bill–despite the fact that the bill was vigorously opposed by a large percentage of the American public.

While the legal battle challenging the constitutionality of the law is just getting started and is likely to continue for some time, the biotech industry is just starting to process what yesterday’s vote will mean for its industry.

BIO,  the biotech industry organization, released a statement on the vote yesterday, which took a decidedly positive tone.  In support of its position, BIO cited three key benefits of the bill:

  1. The bill provides hope for Americans living with debilitating diseases.
  2. The bill created a pathway to enable the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) to approve biosimilars.
  3. The bill included a Therapeutic Discovery Project Tax Credit, which is designed to provide financial relief to some biotech companies that are suffering in tight credit markets.

Why was BIO so positive about this legislation?

Well, the remarks suggest that BIO is happy with several of the carrots that were thrown at the industry in this bill: biosimilar legislation and a tax credit for biotech companies.

Noticeably absent in the BIO statement, however, was any statement to the effect that health care reform will advance the biotech industry in any way.  Instead, the only reference made to reform itself was that it will bring “hope” to Americans suffering from diseases.  Is this an oversight on BIO’s part?  In my opinion, no.

While there is no doubt that most biotech industry members applaud the idea of providing health care to all Americans, and you can certainly say that reform will increase the potential customer base for biotech products, it is a definite  stretch to say that this reform bill will prove beneficial in any way to the biotech industry.   How could it?  Any enterpreneur in the biotech space knows that the U.S. market has always been the most lucrative due to compensation issues–the U.S. consumer finances the world’s drug development costs.  What happens when you impose drug price controls, which are inevitable in government-controlled health care?  It doesn’t take an expert to see that the world’s most lucrative market will become a lot less lucrative.  It will become like most of the other markets in the world, which have price controls, too.  This kind of change will inevitably impact entrepreneurship in the biotech space.  Launching a biotech company requires huge risk and tremendous investment capital.  Will the capital be there when the huge  potential payoff is not?  It will take a huge amount of increased business to make up for the loss of revenues in the U.S. market due to price controls.  Will what is left be enough to encourage drug development?

While the answer to that question is still unclear, I think it is a safe bet that true entrepreneurs will find away to adapt to the new realities of the market.  Many entrepreneurs–me included–have had to do this in the past year to survive the recession.  I have adjusted my business model completely to deal with the new realities of the legal market,  and I think it is a safe bet that many other small businesses who survive this recession will have done the same thing for their markets.  I am sure that there will be biotech entrepreneurs who can adjust their business models to the new realities of the U.S. market after the passage of this bill as well.

Having said this, there is no question that this bill is going to have an impact on the industry.  Change is coming to biotech–and it may not be the kind of change that members of the biotech industry wanted.

So, what about the carrots that got thrown into this bill for the industry?  What kind of impact will those carrots have on the industry?

Well, the tax credit may be beneficial to some companies, but my guess is that it will have a minimal impact on struggling companies who are unable to land the capital they need to survive this recession.   It seems a stretch to say that a tax credit is going to “save and create thousands of jobs across our nation” as the BIO statement claims.  A tax credit only helps if you are generating revenue to pay taxes with, and many stuggling biotechs likely need investment capital more than they need a tax credit at this point in time.

As for the biosimilars piece to the legislation, this topic has been heavily debated for some time and remains controversial.  It is legislation that is going to benefit some companies at the expense of other companies, so it is difficult to say it really will “benefit” biotech.  The legislation will benefit companies seeking to manufacture biosimilars at the expense of the brand.  The California Biotech Law Blog will explore this issue in more detail in a separate blog entry.  The bottom line is that BIO is supporting the legislation simply because it creates a pathway for the approval of biosimilars, which previously did not exist, and BIO is taking the position that this is the right decision for biotech.

All in all, the impact of this bill on biotech is one that may be debated and evaluated in the months to come.  The California Biotech Law Blog will continue to follow the developments as they unfold.

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Biosimilars Legislation Introduced in House

Written by on Friday, March 20th, 2009

Two biosimilars bills have just been introduced in the House, each of which would establish regulatory path for biosimilars to be approved.

The first bill, HR 1427, the Promoting Innovation and Access to Life Saving Medicine Act, was introduced on March 11, 2009 by Representatives Henry Waxman (D-CA), Frank Pallone (D-NJ), Nathan Deal (R-GA), and Jo Ann Emerson (R-MO).

A second bill was introduced the following week. H.R. 1548, the Pathway to BioSimilars Act, was introduced on March 17, 2009 by Representatives Anna Eshoo (D-CA), Jay Inslee (D-WA), and Joe Barton (R-TX).

What are the key elements of each of the bills?

According to the HR 1427 Bill Summary, highlights of HR 1427 include as follows:

  • FDA authority to approve biosimilars;
  • approval process will require showing that (1) there are no clinically meaningful differences between the two products and (2) that the two products are highly similar in molecular structure and share the same mechanisms of action;
  • biosimilar may establish that it is “interchangeable” with the original product, and the first such biosimilar able to make such a showing will receive six months of exclusive marketing;
  • an original product with a novel molecular structure is entitled to five years of exclusive marketing, and a modification of a previously approved product is entitled to three years of exclusive marketing.  These periods can be extended by up to one year if it can be established that the product can be used for a new disease or that it conducts pediatric studies; and
  • a new procedure is established to resolve patent disputes prior to approval of the biosimilar, and penalties are put in place for failure to timely litigate such disputes.

In contrast, highlights of HR 1548 are as follows:

  • establishes safey standards for establishing interchangeability;
  • establishes exclusivity for the first  product found to be “interchangeable”  for a period of 24 months after the product has either been deemed to be interechangeable or goes on sale;
  • the reference product receives 12 years exclusivity, and that period of exclusivity will extend to 14 years in the event that a new indication is found for the product in the first 8 years after licensure;
  • an additional exclusivity period is also established for pediatric studies and use of product;

Which bill has been more widely received by the biotech industry?

Well, the biotech industry group BIO has indicated its preference for the second bill, according to reports by Fierce Biotech.    Fierce Biotech explained as follows:

For biotech companies, the difference between five years and 12 years of exclusivity could amount to billions of dollars.

In contrast, BIO did not have such a positive opinion of the first bill, stating in a press release as follows:

Unfortunately, the legislation introduced today would take patients and our industry down the wrong path – a path that jeopardizes the continued development of new breakthrough therapies and potential cures for debilitating diseases such as multiple sclerosis, HIV/AIDS and Alzheimer’s. . . .

“This bill seeks to cut prices but instead cuts corners.  This proposal leads us off the map as we seek an effective, fair and safe pathway to a biosimilars market.

“The legislation introduced today does not strike the necessary balance for patients or the economy.   Any biosimilars legislation must ensure safe and effective biosimilars, promote the continued development of new therapies and cures, and ensure the benefits of additional competition among biologics through the entry of biosimilars.

The California Biotech Law Blog will continue to follow this issue as debate on each of the proposed bills continues.

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